Microsoft Edge launches support for iPad and Android tablets

The debate over which browser is the best has been going for nearly as long as the internet has been around. Though Microsoft’s Internet Explorer was once the butt of many jokes, the company has been doing some neat things with Microsoft Edge, which was introduced alongside Windows 10. If, by chance, Microsoft has managed to win you over with the features in Edge, then here’s a bit of good news: It’s available on more platforms beginning today.

Microsoft has announced that Edge is now available to everyone using an iPad or an Android tablet. We knew this day was coming up quickly, as Microsoft launched a beta test of Edge on iPads earlier this month. The fact that the browser is also coming to Android tablets today is a happy – though not entirely unexpected – surprise.

Edge on tablets is going look very similar to Edge on smartphones. There isn’t a whole lot that’s new here, aside from the obvious addition of support for larger screens. Edge’s “continue on PC” feature is also present in these tablet apps, so assuming your phone has been linked to your computer, you’ll be able to share webpages between the two with the tap of a button.

Other than that, though, these are essentially the smartphone apps optimized for the larger screen of your tablet. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but as The Verge points out, it means that Edge is missing some features you would expect on a tablet. This is especially evident in the iPad version of the app, which doesn’t have any kind of splitscreen support for the iPad Pro.

The hope, of course, is that Microsoft improves the tablet versions of Edge over time, instead of just optimizing them for larger displays and stopping there. We’ll see if Microsoft eventually launches some more tablet-friendly features for Edge, but for now, the newest version of the app can be found over on the iOS App Store [download] and the Google Play Store [download].

Original Text ►► Microsoft Edge launches support for iPad and Android tablets

Sea of Thieves drops plans for “death tax” after community pushback

Now that Sea of Thieves has launched, Rare is looking to improve the game with new features and updates. Right now, Sea of Thieves can feel a little feature-light, with PvP dominating the game because there aren’t really any penalties in place for failing. Recently, Rare announced to plans to change that by deducting gold from players who die on the high seas, but after an outcry from players, it seems those plans have changed.

First, a little background for those who are unfamiliar with the way death works in Sea of Thieves. At the moment, dying isn’t much of an inconvenience – when you kick the bucket, you’re forced to wait on a ghost ship for a small amount of time, after which you’re teleported back to your ship (assuming it’s still floating) alive and well, ready to continue the fight.

While forcing people to wait a short amount of time before they’re revived helps ensure players don’t get caught in endless battles where pirates on both sides are constantly reviving, that’s really the only penalty for dying that’s in place at the moment. This can cause some people to be little bit reckless in how they play the game, attacking anyone they come across instead of playing the game in a more reserved manner.

To combat this, Rare announced plans to implement a death tax over on the game’s official forums, essentially charging people gold for dying. Gold is somewhat difficult to come across in Sea of Thieves, so as you can imagine, the community didn’t react very well to this plan. Though Rare later updated the forum post to say that it never intended to charge players gold for dying in player-vs-player combat, the reaction to this feature was already in the books as negative.

Now, Sea of Thieves executive producer Joe Neate has taken to Twitter to announce that Rare is dropping plans to implement a death tax. “Letting everyone know we’ve heard the feedback and the proposed ‘Death Cost’ in #SeaOfThieves is, well, dead,” Neate wrote. “We messed up with the messaging around this, and it’s now gone. Thanks for the honest feedback & discussion on this.”

So, if you were worried that you were going to start losing gold each time you die, you can take a sigh of relief. A number of players actually used that forum post to present a bunch of interesting ideas – such as penalties for losing your ship – so Rare has a few different directions it could go from here. We’ll see where this controversy leads soon enough, so stay tuned.

Original Text ►► Sea of Thieves drops plans for “death tax” after community pushback

Sea of Thieves drops plans for “death tax” after community pushback

Now that Sea of Thieves has launched, Rare is looking to improve the game with new features and updates. Right now, Sea of Thieves can feel a little feature-light, with PvP dominating the game because there aren’t really any penalties in place for failing. Recently, Rare announced to plans to change that by deducting gold from players who die on the high seas, but after an outcry from players, it seems those plans have changed.

First, a little background for those who are unfamiliar with the way death works in Sea of Thieves. At the moment, dying isn’t much of an inconvenience – when you kick the bucket, you’re forced to wait on a ghost ship for a small amount of time, after which you’re teleported back to your ship (assuming it’s still floating) alive and well, ready to continue the fight.

While forcing people to wait a short amount of time before they’re revived helps ensure players don’t get caught in endless battles where pirates on both sides are constantly reviving, that’s really the only penalty for dying that’s in place at the moment. This can cause some people to be little bit reckless in how they play the game, attacking anyone they come across instead of playing the game in a more reserved manner.

To combat this, Rare announced plans to implement a death tax over on the game’s official forums, essentially charging people gold for dying. Gold is somewhat difficult to come across in Sea of Thieves, so as you can imagine, the community didn’t react very well to this plan. Though Rare later updated the forum post to say that it never intended to charge players gold for dying in player-vs-player combat, the reaction to this feature was already in the books as negative.

Now, Sea of Thieves executive producer Joe Neate has taken to Twitter to announce that Rare is dropping plans to implement a death tax. “Letting everyone know we’ve heard the feedback and the proposed ‘Death Cost’ in #SeaOfThieves is, well, dead,” Neate wrote. “We messed up with the messaging around this, and it’s now gone. Thanks for the honest feedback & discussion on this.”

So, if you were worried that you were going to start losing gold each time you die, you can take a sigh of relief. A number of players actually used that forum post to present a bunch of interesting ideas – such as penalties for losing your ship – so Rare has a few different directions it could go from here. We’ll see where this controversy leads soon enough, so stay tuned.

Original Text ►► Sea of Thieves drops plans for “death tax” after community pushback