iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

Today we’re taking a peek at 5 reasons why iPhone and iPad users should update their iOS device to iOS 11.3 immediately. These features range from performance to autocorrect – from the most important features for the average user to features ever-so-slightly less important. No matter how you splice it, the update’s free, and it’s just about Easter weekend, so make an evening of it.

5. Performance Manager Switch

Users can access a new “Battery Health” option to stop the software’s automatic performance throttling to avoid unexpected shutdowns. This is not something I recommend doing, unless you absolutely, positively need your smartphone to run AS FAST as possible. Chances are you’re not one of the very, very few people in this world that need that top performance at all times. If you DO, head to Settings – Battery – Battery Health (Beta).

4. App Review Sorting

For those users that take their app downloading and buying seriously, sorting reviews has arrived. “Four options now allow you to sort the customer reviews on the product pages: the most useful, the most favorable, the most critical or the most recent.” Now we’ll see if people review apps with highest or lowest ratings just to top the list. That’d be not so great.

3. Name and Password Autofill inside apps

Users that don’t just log in to apps using Facebook or Twitter, there’s this. Names and Passwords can be saved to Apple’s memory for the user, then recalled in in-app web views. This applies to webpages that’ve been opened in an app, for example – now they work just like a standard browser like Safari or Chrome for autofilled names and passwords.

2. Your Health Records (Yes, really)

Inside the Health app, users are able to access their health records – just so long as your health system is in the mix. Health Records data is “encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.” This feature was previously available only to those users that’d joined the Apple Beta Software Program. A full list of institutions that are now part of this Health app initiative can be found below.

1. Autocorrect Capitalization Bug Fix

Autocorrect’s most devious plan for destroying every sentence I type included not just correcting my spelling, but adding a capital letter, too. According to the iOS 11 release notes from Apple: “Fixes a problem that could cause the capitalization of the first letter of some words by the automatic correction feature.” At last!

To update your device, head to Settings and tap General – Software Update – Download and Install. From there you should have to wait a while, tap the update button again, and you’ll be good to go.

 

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3: Five features worth the upgrade

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Apple has released iOS 11.3, a major update that gives users a handful of new Animoji characters, a new communication option called Business Chat, additional augmented reality experiences, and much more. Apple also says its Apple TV app will soon be available to Apple TV, iPad, and iPhone users in Mexico and Brazil, the latest markets to get support. Meanwhile, iPhone users specifically get access to the new battery health feature Apple promised to add.
Chief among iOS 11.3’s new features is the expansion of AR experiences, namely support for vertical surfaces (walls, doors, etc). That joins the previous support for horizontal surfaces, such as the floor or a desk surface, paving the way for new types of AR activities. The update also adds better mapping accuracy for irregularly shaped surfaces, one example being circular tables.

As well, ARKit can recognize 2D images, such as posters, and work them into the AR experience; there’s also an improvement to the real-world view via the camera, specifically auto focus support and 50% greater resolution.

The new iOS update also brings four additional Animoji characters: a dragon, lion, bear, and skull. This is specific to iPhone X users, of course, due to the handset’s TrueDepth camera and A11 Bionic chip.

As mentioned, iPhone handsets have also received the previously promised battery health feature, which alerts owners when their battery may need serviced. This will enable the user to get the battery replaced, if desired, to avoid the controversial slow-down practice revealed a few months ago.

Apple enables users to view whether that slow-down (“power management feature”) is active; they can optionally disable it. Both the battery health indicator and power management toggle are found under the Settings > Battery menu, and are available for the iPhone 6 and newer.

Other features arriving with iOS 11.3 include Business Chat, a new way for someone to swap messages with a business using the Messages app. The feature is in beta as of today, at least in the US, with plans for certain big companies to start rolling out the feature to their own customers. iPad and iPhone users will see the option to message these businesses via the new chat option when searching for them in Safari, Search, Siri, or Maps.

Health Records is another new feature, one that currently has more than 40 participating health systems from places like Duke, Yale, and Stanford. With it, users can view their medical records, including medication and lab work, using their iPhone. Health Records requires the user to enter a passcode; the data is encrypted.

Apple is also making it easier for users to understand how the company could be using their personal data. A privacy icon has been added alongside detailed info on privacy in iOS 11.3, and it’ll show up whenever Apple asks the user to grant access to their data for things like features and services.

Those are the major changes, but Apple does include a changelog detailing a bunch of other notable aspects of the update, such as uninterrupted music video streams on Apple Music, the addition of a new Video group in Apple News’ “For You,” section, Siri support on Apple TV and Apple TV 4K in Brazil, HomeKit tweaks for devs, Advanced Mobile Location support, and Apple Pay support for commuters in Shanghai and Beijing.

SOURCE: Apple

Original Text ►► iOS 11.3 arrives: iPhone battery features, new Animoji, ARKit update, and more

Why PUBG on Android is better than Fortnite on iPhone

Android users rejoice, for the gaming experience in PUBG mobile is better than that of Fortnite mobile. This should quite obviously be understood as an entirely subjective sort of declaration, but my reasons are basic and, I believe, pretty universal. When I play Fortnite mobile, I die right away, and when I play PUBG mobile, I don’t die nearly quite so quick.

I Die

The intricacies of the game in Fortnite for iOS are encouraging. This is easily one of the most involved and awesome online games created for the mobile platform. Those gamers given the opportunity to play Fortnite mobile via invite are lucky, because this game is incredible. But there’s a big problem with this game, for me: I die.

I die right away, and I die pitifully. I get crushed pitifully early, and I rarely find the time to loot enough to put up a decent defense. This game is mobile, sure, but for me it’s too quick. Games on smartphones and tablets should be potentially quick. But with these games, I feel as though there’s a necessity that there be a LITTLE bit of a chance to live, or maybe even knock another player out.

I Live

With PUBG, PlayerUnknown’s BattleGrounds, for iOS and Android, there’s a chance for glory. There’s certainly still a chance that I might get headshot in the first 5 minutes, but there’s plenty of time for me to get out there and find a helmet. I can find my way into a building, suit up – or at least find a weapon – and be back out on the run before someone else spots me.

Over at Kotaku, author Cameron Kunzelman has similar thoughts on the PC and console-based versions of these same games. There, Kunzelman suggests that PUBG is slow, and that’s a good thing. When it comes to mobile, I say that’s doubly true.

On Small Bots

In Fortnite, the world feels too small. The chances are too high that I be killed in a span of time less than that of the span I waited for the game to begin. That’s just frustrating. In PUBG, even IF their strategy for new players is to put them up against what Reddit suggests are low-level bots, it’s working. It’s making me feel like I’m at least OK at the game, and the more time I play, the more I feel I have to lose if I don’t continue.

You Android gamers still waiting for the Android release of Fortnite, don’t worry. You’re not missing a lot. Not yet, anyway. We’ll be continuing to play both games well into the future, so we’ll let you know if anything changes.

Original Text ►► Why PUBG on Android is better than Fortnite on iPhone

Microsoft Edge launches support for iPad and Android tablets

The debate over which browser is the best has been going for nearly as long as the internet has been around. Though Microsoft’s Internet Explorer was once the butt of many jokes, the company has been doing some neat things with Microsoft Edge, which was introduced alongside Windows 10. If, by chance, Microsoft has managed to win you over with the features in Edge, then here’s a bit of good news: It’s available on more platforms beginning today.

Microsoft has announced that Edge is now available to everyone using an iPad or an Android tablet. We knew this day was coming up quickly, as Microsoft launched a beta test of Edge on iPads earlier this month. The fact that the browser is also coming to Android tablets today is a happy – though not entirely unexpected – surprise.

Edge on tablets is going look very similar to Edge on smartphones. There isn’t a whole lot that’s new here, aside from the obvious addition of support for larger screens. Edge’s “continue on PC” feature is also present in these tablet apps, so assuming your phone has been linked to your computer, you’ll be able to share webpages between the two with the tap of a button.

Other than that, though, these are essentially the smartphone apps optimized for the larger screen of your tablet. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but as The Verge points out, it means that Edge is missing some features you would expect on a tablet. This is especially evident in the iPad version of the app, which doesn’t have any kind of splitscreen support for the iPad Pro.

The hope, of course, is that Microsoft improves the tablet versions of Edge over time, instead of just optimizing them for larger displays and stopping there. We’ll see if Microsoft eventually launches some more tablet-friendly features for Edge, but for now, the newest version of the app can be found over on the iOS App Store [download] and the Google Play Store [download].

Original Text ►► Microsoft Edge launches support for iPad and Android tablets

Isn’t Apple’s big secret obvious?

In the past few weeks we’ve seen some real crazy rumors about what Apple will present today at their big education event. They’ve included cheaper iPads, a new MacBook Air, and even a new iMac Pro. One wildly maniacal rumor suggested Apple was making a new iPad to fight the last vestiges of resistance in the Android tablet market. But what’s most obvious – and most likely – isn’t what Apple’s hiding. It’s what Apple’s already made plainly obvious.

Apple’s holding an event in Chicago that’s not live-streamed and IS low key. Or as low key as a real Apple event is able to get. Apple’s session today will be largely visceral, centering in on the feeling educators get when they find a tool they can use, and afford, and have the opportunity to attain.

Holding the event at a school makes Apple one of the people – a group of motivators for the buyers, but straight to the students. Apple’s doing what Google did with the Chromebook Tablet, but out in the open. They’re making a show of their visit to the education market, where their next big release will be.

Above you’ll see the “What’s a computer” advertisement from Apple about the iPad Pro. It’s there that you’ll find your answer. It’s there that Apple’s already revealed what they’ll bring to schools in the near future. They already have the technology schools need to expand their horizons – now they just need to make the connection with the cash the schools in the USA just… don’t really have.

Watch our coverage of the Apple event throughout the day today, or if you’re reading this later on, hit up our Apple Hub. There you’ll find Apple’s next big step into the education market, on a distribution tip, and at the connecting point. The iPad Pro is about to change – or at least SEEM to change – the way Apple works with students, teachers, and everyone in-between.

Original Text ►► Isn’t Apple’s big secret obvious?