Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google has announced plans to shutter its goo.gl URL shortener starting in April for most people and in early 2019 for everyone else. The service launched back in 2009, but the way users share content has changed substantially in the years since, Google says. Mobile devices are the primary way most people get content, and the need for a URL shortener has gone down as a result.

A URL shortener, of course, is a service that takes a page’s address and shortens it to a smaller URL, in this case one that features “goo.gl” in it. Because mobile devices, apps, and web apps are now the most common way to access data, Google is shifting focus away from goo.gl and to Firebase Dynamic Links — smart URLs that take users to any given region within a mobile app.

That’s for developers and serves as a way to get more people away from a website or mobile website and to a mobile app. For ordinary consumers, anyone who hasn’t used Google’s URL shortening service and for anonymous users, the goo.gl console will no longer be accessible starting on April 13, 2018.

However, existing users who have previously created short links will be able to use the service until March 30, 2019, after which point it will be officially discontinued. Users can still manage short links through the console until that time, Google says. The good news is that existing goo.gl links will continue to work after the service is discontinued.

SOURCE: Google Blog

Original Text ►► Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google has announced plans to shutter its goo.gl URL shortener starting in April for most people and in early 2019 for everyone else. The service launched back in 2009, but the way users share content has changed substantially in the years since, Google says. Mobile devices are the primary way most people get content, and the need for a URL shortener has gone down as a result.

A URL shortener, of course, is a service that takes a page’s address and shortens it to a smaller URL, in this case one that features “goo.gl” in it. Because mobile devices, apps, and web apps are now the most common way to access data, Google is shifting focus away from goo.gl and to Firebase Dynamic Links — smart URLs that take users to any given region within a mobile app.

That’s for developers and serves as a way to get more people away from a website or mobile website and to a mobile app. For ordinary consumers, anyone who hasn’t used Google’s URL shortening service and for anonymous users, the goo.gl console will no longer be accessible starting on April 13, 2018.

However, existing users who have previously created short links will be able to use the service until March 30, 2019, after which point it will be officially discontinued. Users can still manage short links through the console until that time, Google says. The good news is that existing goo.gl links will continue to work after the service is discontinued.

SOURCE: Google Blog

Original Text ►► Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla, the company that recently called out Facebook’s current default data settings, has just released an extension that addresses the platform’s potential privacy issues. Called the Facebook Container Extension, this new offering stuffs Facebook into its own container tab whenever the social network is accessed, helping ensure the user’s data isn’t tracked.

Mozilla has focused heavily on privacy-related products in recent months, launching things like its Firefox Focus mobile browser. The company previously launched Multi-Account Containers, an extension for using multiple IDs or accounts at the same time in a single browser. The Facebook Container Extension builds upon that, but is focused specifically on the social network.

Facebook Container Extension, once installed in the user’s Firefox browser, makes it harder for Facebook to use cookies to track what they do on other sites. Upon installing the extension, Facebook Container will delete any existing Facebook cookies and then long the user out of their account. That user then logs back in, at which time the tab will show up with a blue color to indicate its container status.

Within that tab, the user is able to use Facebook like usual, including clicking links to other sites. Any link that takes the user to a non-Facebook destination will open in a different tab outside of the container. “This makes it harder for Facebook to track your activity on other websites via third-party cookies,” Mozilla explains.

There is some minor inconvenience associated with the tab, namely that external like and share buttons on other sites may not work. That is intended to prevent the social network from associating activity data with the Facebook user.

Original Text ►► Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla, the company that recently called out Facebook’s current default data settings, has just released an extension that addresses the platform’s potential privacy issues. Called the Facebook Container Extension, this new offering stuffs Facebook into its own container tab whenever the social network is accessed, helping ensure the user’s data isn’t tracked.

Mozilla has focused heavily on privacy-related products in recent months, launching things like its Firefox Focus mobile browser. The company previously launched Multi-Account Containers, an extension for using multiple IDs or accounts at the same time in a single browser. The Facebook Container Extension builds upon that, but is focused specifically on the social network.

Facebook Container Extension, once installed in the user’s Firefox browser, makes it harder for Facebook to use cookies to track what they do on other sites. Upon installing the extension, Facebook Container will delete any existing Facebook cookies and then long the user out of their account. That user then logs back in, at which time the tab will show up with a blue color to indicate its container status.

Within that tab, the user is able to use Facebook like usual, including clicking links to other sites. Any link that takes the user to a non-Facebook destination will open in a different tab outside of the container. “This makes it harder for Facebook to track your activity on other websites via third-party cookies,” Mozilla explains.

There is some minor inconvenience associated with the tab, namely that external like and share buttons on other sites may not work. That is intended to prevent the social network from associating activity data with the Facebook user.

Original Text ►► Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users