Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google has announced plans to shutter its goo.gl URL shortener starting in April for most people and in early 2019 for everyone else. The service launched back in 2009, but the way users share content has changed substantially in the years since, Google says. Mobile devices are the primary way most people get content, and the need for a URL shortener has gone down as a result.

A URL shortener, of course, is a service that takes a page’s address and shortens it to a smaller URL, in this case one that features “goo.gl” in it. Because mobile devices, apps, and web apps are now the most common way to access data, Google is shifting focus away from goo.gl and to Firebase Dynamic Links — smart URLs that take users to any given region within a mobile app.

That’s for developers and serves as a way to get more people away from a website or mobile website and to a mobile app. For ordinary consumers, anyone who hasn’t used Google’s URL shortening service and for anonymous users, the goo.gl console will no longer be accessible starting on April 13, 2018.

However, existing users who have previously created short links will be able to use the service until March 30, 2019, after which point it will be officially discontinued. Users can still manage short links through the console until that time, Google says. The good news is that existing goo.gl links will continue to work after the service is discontinued.

SOURCE: Google Blog

Original Text ►► Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google has announced plans to shutter its goo.gl URL shortener starting in April for most people and in early 2019 for everyone else. The service launched back in 2009, but the way users share content has changed substantially in the years since, Google says. Mobile devices are the primary way most people get content, and the need for a URL shortener has gone down as a result.

A URL shortener, of course, is a service that takes a page’s address and shortens it to a smaller URL, in this case one that features “goo.gl” in it. Because mobile devices, apps, and web apps are now the most common way to access data, Google is shifting focus away from goo.gl and to Firebase Dynamic Links — smart URLs that take users to any given region within a mobile app.

That’s for developers and serves as a way to get more people away from a website or mobile website and to a mobile app. For ordinary consumers, anyone who hasn’t used Google’s URL shortening service and for anonymous users, the goo.gl console will no longer be accessible starting on April 13, 2018.

However, existing users who have previously created short links will be able to use the service until March 30, 2019, after which point it will be officially discontinued. Users can still manage short links through the console until that time, Google says. The good news is that existing goo.gl links will continue to work after the service is discontinued.

SOURCE: Google Blog

Original Text ►► Google URL shortener goo.gl will be shuttered in 2019

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Google has stripped autocomplete searches featuring the term “Kodi” from its search engine in an effort to address piracy associated with the software. Though Kodi itself is not a piracy tool, it has become associated with add-ons that make it easy to find pirated content, causing the general public to associate it with illegally uploaded videos and music.
Kodi is perhaps most famous as an app to load onto “jailbroken” Fire Stick devices. The app is pointed toward certain repositories that provide users with links to third-party destinations where pirated content is hosted and available to stream. The software itself, however, is simply a robust media center alternative to Plex.

According to TorrentFreak, Google has removed Kodi from its autocomplete searches. This isn’t the first time Google has targeted piracy, nor the first time it has removed related terms from autocomplete. The company previously removed terms like Bittorrent and uTorrent from Search’s autocomplete feature.

A spokesperson confirmed the removal to the publication, saying the Kodi filtering is part of Google’s “long-standing strategy” to address “terms closely associated with copyright infringement.” Critics argue that the decision to filter the name only reinforces the misconception that Kodi is designed for piracy rather than simply used by some content pirates.

Original Text ►► Google targets Kodi in latest anti-piracy effort

Another step toward the perfect smartphone

When I say “the perfect smartphone” I of course mean the four-sided screen. That is the dream of the panel you hold in your hand without any sign of interruption – logos, buttons, or anything in-between. That dream is one step closer to reality now that phones are coming with a feature that’s going live thanks to a group called Goodix.

The folks at Goodix create several sorts of products, the most important of these being their “Innovative Biometric Solutions.” Most important to our subject matter today, that is to say. They’ve made clear over the past few weeks that they’re the reason why several early adopter manufacturers were able to bring an in-display fingerprint sensor to the market before anyone else.

Goodix created what they call “Goodix’s Optical IN-DISPLAY FINGERPRINT SENSOR.” They’ve branded it in all caps like that because they’re VERY PROUD OF THEIR AWESOME NEW TECHNOLOGY. They’ve delivered this tech this week to the Porsche Design Huawei Mate RS. This is the super-duper-premium version of the Huawei Mate RS, a device which also rolls with a flexible OLED display.

There’s also a Goodix fingerprint sensor in the Huawei P20 and P20 Pro, but they’re not under the display just yet. It’s not for lack of trying, as Goodix’s current solution works with both flexible and rigid OLED displays. They’ve also delivered an in-display fingerprint sensor to the vivo X21.

“The era of bezel-free smartphones has arrived, it is imperative to offer differentiating values through innovative products to excel in competitions,” said a Goodix representative this week. “Through five years of exploration, the commercialization of IN-DISPLAY FINGERPRINT SENSOR on PORSCHE DESIGN HUAWEI Mate RS, and vivo X21 only marks the beginning.”

It’s a real deliverable now. Any phone without an in-display fingerprint sensor is going to look like it’s been left out in the cold from this point on. Every single one of them.

Original Text ►► Another step toward the perfect smartphone

Another step toward the perfect smartphone

When I say “the perfect smartphone” I of course mean the four-sided screen. That is the dream of the panel you hold in your hand without any sign of interruption – logos, buttons, or anything in-between. That dream is one step closer to reality now that phones are coming with a feature that’s going live thanks to a group called Goodix.

The folks at Goodix create several sorts of products, the most important of these being their “Innovative Biometric Solutions.” Most important to our subject matter today, that is to say. They’ve made clear over the past few weeks that they’re the reason why several early adopter manufacturers were able to bring an in-display fingerprint sensor to the market before anyone else.

Goodix created what they call “Goodix’s Optical IN-DISPLAY FINGERPRINT SENSOR.” They’ve branded it in all caps like that because they’re VERY PROUD OF THEIR AWESOME NEW TECHNOLOGY. They’ve delivered this tech this week to the Porsche Design Huawei Mate RS. This is the super-duper-premium version of the Huawei Mate RS, a device which also rolls with a flexible OLED display.

There’s also a Goodix fingerprint sensor in the Huawei P20 and P20 Pro, but they’re not under the display just yet. It’s not for lack of trying, as Goodix’s current solution works with both flexible and rigid OLED displays. They’ve also delivered an in-display fingerprint sensor to the vivo X21.

“The era of bezel-free smartphones has arrived, it is imperative to offer differentiating values through innovative products to excel in competitions,” said a Goodix representative this week. “Through five years of exploration, the commercialization of IN-DISPLAY FINGERPRINT SENSOR on PORSCHE DESIGN HUAWEI Mate RS, and vivo X21 only marks the beginning.”

It’s a real deliverable now. Any phone without an in-display fingerprint sensor is going to look like it’s been left out in the cold from this point on. Every single one of them.

Original Text ►► Another step toward the perfect smartphone