Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Apple’s iMessage isn’t just for talking to your friends, anymore.
Today Apple officially rolled out its new Business Chat feature as part of the iOS 11.3 update. First previewed during last year’s WWDC, Business Chat allows people to message companies in iMessage much like the way Facebook users chat with businesses on Messenger.
SEE ALSO: Apple CEO Tim Cook just dunked on Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg
Though Apple’s version of the feature is still in beta and only in the United States and Canda for now, it could mark the start of some serious competition for Facebook.
Much like Facebook Messenger, which has been enticing businesses for years, Apple’s new service lets users chat directly with companies using iMessage. The option will start to show up for participating businesses (Home Depot, Marriott, and Wells Fargo are among a handful of early partners) when you search for them in Maps, Safari, or Spotlight Search on your iPhone.

Once you’ve started a thread, you can ask questions or make purchases using Apple Pay.

While Facebook has a years-long head start in the space, Apple could pose a serious threat if they’re able to persuade businesses to sign on en masse the way Facebook has with Messenger. If users could chat with companies with one search from their iPhone, it would eliminate the extra step of turning to Facebook.

The release also comes at a particularly difficult moment for Facebook, which is currently grappling with a mounting controversy over how it’s handled users’ personal data. Earlier in the week, the company announced it was pausing new messaging bots in Messenger amid privacy concerns.

Though just a temporary measure, it could make Apple a more attractive alternative to developers frustrated by Facebook’s changing priorities.

Apple is touting Business Chat’s ability to let people “reach a live person to ask a question” — possibly a dig at Facebook’s bot-centric approach — and its commitment to privacy.

“Users are always in control of their contact information — businesses will not receive any personal data by default,” the company wrote in its announcement.

Original Text ►► Apple puts Facebook on notice with Business Chat in iMessage

Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla, the company that recently called out Facebook’s current default data settings, has just released an extension that addresses the platform’s potential privacy issues. Called the Facebook Container Extension, this new offering stuffs Facebook into its own container tab whenever the social network is accessed, helping ensure the user’s data isn’t tracked.

Mozilla has focused heavily on privacy-related products in recent months, launching things like its Firefox Focus mobile browser. The company previously launched Multi-Account Containers, an extension for using multiple IDs or accounts at the same time in a single browser. The Facebook Container Extension builds upon that, but is focused specifically on the social network.

Facebook Container Extension, once installed in the user’s Firefox browser, makes it harder for Facebook to use cookies to track what they do on other sites. Upon installing the extension, Facebook Container will delete any existing Facebook cookies and then long the user out of their account. That user then logs back in, at which time the tab will show up with a blue color to indicate its container status.

Within that tab, the user is able to use Facebook like usual, including clicking links to other sites. Any link that takes the user to a non-Facebook destination will open in a different tab outside of the container. “This makes it harder for Facebook to track your activity on other websites via third-party cookies,” Mozilla explains.

There is some minor inconvenience associated with the tab, namely that external like and share buttons on other sites may not work. That is intended to prevent the social network from associating activity data with the Facebook user.

Original Text ►► Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users

Mozilla, the company that recently called out Facebook’s current default data settings, has just released an extension that addresses the platform’s potential privacy issues. Called the Facebook Container Extension, this new offering stuffs Facebook into its own container tab whenever the social network is accessed, helping ensure the user’s data isn’t tracked.

Mozilla has focused heavily on privacy-related products in recent months, launching things like its Firefox Focus mobile browser. The company previously launched Multi-Account Containers, an extension for using multiple IDs or accounts at the same time in a single browser. The Facebook Container Extension builds upon that, but is focused specifically on the social network.

Facebook Container Extension, once installed in the user’s Firefox browser, makes it harder for Facebook to use cookies to track what they do on other sites. Upon installing the extension, Facebook Container will delete any existing Facebook cookies and then long the user out of their account. That user then logs back in, at which time the tab will show up with a blue color to indicate its container status.

Within that tab, the user is able to use Facebook like usual, including clicking links to other sites. Any link that takes the user to a non-Facebook destination will open in a different tab outside of the container. “This makes it harder for Facebook to track your activity on other websites via third-party cookies,” Mozilla explains.

There is some minor inconvenience associated with the tab, namely that external like and share buttons on other sites may not work. That is intended to prevent the social network from associating activity data with the Facebook user.

Original Text ►► Mozilla’s new add-on isolates Facebook in container tab to protect users